Understanding unwanted pregnancy from the perspectives of the Namibian male youth

Immaculate Mogotsi, Paulus Mwetulundila

Abstract

The aim of this paper was to understand the perceptions of Namibian male youth regarding unwanted pregnancy. This study is based on secondary data from the study titled “Understanding factors associated with unwanted pregnancy in Namibia, it used mixed methods, integrating qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. For this study, only responses pertaining to male youth aged 15 to 22 years were used for analysis.  The research findings showed that, even though the male youth knew about the consequences of pregnancy, they still engaged in unprotected sex. Male condoms were the only male controlled contraceptive available to male youth and condoms were seen to protect against HIV, STIs and unwanted pregnancies. Even though the male youth had this knowledge, it appears that inconsistent condom use remained a challenge. The respondents were aware of and had limited access to condoms, more than 30% of the male youth had impregnated female youth. Impregnating and being a learner-parent inhibit the educational attainment of male youth. Unwanted pregnancy is a concern among male youth and this study recommends targeted sexual and reproductive health intervention for male youth. (Afr J Reprod Health 2020; 24[3]: 41-50).

The aim of this paper was to understand the perceptions of Namibian male youth regarding unwanted pregnancy. This study is based on secondary data from the study titled “Understanding factors associated with unwanted pregnancy in Namibia, it used mixed methods, integrating qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. For this study, only responses pertaining to male youth aged 15 to 22 years were used for analysis.  The research findings showed that, even though the male youth knew about the consequences of pregnancy, they still engaged in unprotected sex. Male condoms were the only male controlled contraceptive available to male youth and condoms were seen to protect against HIV, STIs and unwanted pregnancies. Even though the male youth had this knowledge, it appears that inconsistent condom use remained a challenge. The respondents were aware of and had limited access to condoms, more than 30% of the male youth had impregnated female youth. Impregnating and being a learner-parent inhibit the educational attainment of male youth. Unwanted pregnancy is a concern among male youth and this study recommends targeted sexual and reproductive health intervention for male youth. (Afr J Reprod Health 2020; 24[3]: 41-50).

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